OLYMPUS(Australia) >
TETSURO SHIMIZU

TETSURO SHIMIZU

I’m in pain. My ears and cheeks and fingertips feel like they’re about to be torn off. Worse than the wind-blown grains of sand is the cold that comes stabbing through my skin. If I expose myself to the wind much longer, I’m going to get frostbite for sure. Most people never think of the desert as anything but hot, but this is certainly not true of Mongolia’s Gobi Desert. The calendar shows it's the beginning of spring, but the landscape has patches of snow and the temperature is 16 degrees below zero Celsius. With the wind chill from the howling gale, it’s even colder. The wind is the most dangerous thing in the desert.

You know, photographers must be one of the most out-of-their-mind beings. Rain, blizzards, sandstorms. The more I experience the intensity of Nature, the more I’m drawn to it and the more I want to capture it. Even I don't understand how I get the courage to keep pursuing what I see before my eyes until my body is ready to give out.

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm F2.8 PRO that I used on this trip is a large-aperture extreme wide-angle zoom lens that will astonish you when you look through the viewfinder. From a lake in the desolate frozen north of Mongolia to sandstorms in the desert, this lens gave me stress-free shooting and delivered exactly what I was looking for. The way it functioned flawlessly in the desert while sand was mercilessly beating against it from all directions brought the master craftsmen who created this lens to mind.

TETSURO SHIMIZU

TETSURO SHIMIZU

Japan

Graduating from Nippon Photography Institute in 1995, Shimizu worked as an assistant until becoming a freelance photographer in 1998. His subjects range from landscapes to snapshots to documentary. He won the 1st Younosuke Natori Photography Award in 2005 and is a member of Japan’s Photographers Society.